Tuesday, August 3, 2021
Mitochondrial Health

Nucleus||Chromosomes||Chromatin||Nucleolus||Histone protein||DNA||



In cell biology, the nucleus (pl. nuclei; from Latin nucleus or nuculeus, meaning kernel or seed) is a membrane-bound organelle found in eukaryotic cells. Eukaryotes usually have a single nucleus, but a few cell types, such as mammalian red blood cells, have no nuclei, and a few others including osteoclasts have many. The main structures making up the nucleus are the nuclear envelope, a double membrane that encloses the entire organelle and isolates its contents from the cellular cytoplasm; and the nuclear matrix (which includes the nuclear lamina), a network within the nucleus that adds mechanical support, much like the cytoskeleton supports the cell as a whole.

HeLa cells stained for nuclear DNA with the blue fluorescent Hoechst dye. The central and rightmost cell are in interphase, thus their entire nuclei are labeled. On the left, a cell is going through mitosis and its DNA has condensed.

Cell biologyAnimal cell diagram

Components of a typical animal cell:

Nucleolus

Nucleus

Ribosome (dots as part of 5)

Vesicle

Rough endoplasmic reticulum

Golgi apparatus (or, Golgi body)

Cytoskeleton

Smooth endoplasmic reticulum

Mitochondrion

Vacuole

Cytosol (fluid that contains organelles; with which, comprises cytoplasm)

Lysosome

Centrosome

Cell membrane

The cell nucleus contains all of the cell’s genome, except for the small amount of mitochondrial DNA and, in plant cells, plastid DNA. Nuclear DNA is organized as multiple long linear molecules in a complex with a large variety of proteins, such as histones, to form chromosomes. The genes within these chromosomes are structured in such a way to promote cell function. The nucleus maintains the integrity of genes and controls the activities of the cell by regulating gene expression—the nucleus is, therefore, the control center of the cell.

Because the nuclear envelope is impermeable to large molecules, nuclear pores are required to regulate nuclear transport of molecules across the envelope. The pores cross both nuclear membranes, providing a channel through which larger molecules must be actively transported by carrier proteins while allowing free movement of small molecules and ions. Movement of large molecules such as proteins and RNA through the
pores is required for both gene expression and the maintenance of chromosomes.

Although the interior of the nucleus does not contain any membrane-bound subcompartments, its contents are not uniform, and a number of nuclear bodies exist, made up of unique proteins, RNA molecules, and particular parts of the chromosomes. The best-known of these is the nucleolus, which is mainly involved in the assembly of ribosomes. After being produced in the nucleolus, ribosomes are exported to the cytoplasm where they translate messenger RNA.

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